What are you reading?

@ArthurG much appreciated

excited to make friends, looks like we may be the only two on here

reading anything these days?

2 Likes

@womp there are definitely others on here, but so far the participation rate in the forum is relatively low. Hopefully that will improve over time. People have a lot of distractions these days. Back in the day the Lucidity Institute forum was very lively once it got established, but that was also before social media as we presently know it. In any case for all we know a lot of people in Night Club are reading things, they are just not talking about it… :thinking:

Currently I’m still slowly reading Why We Sleep, also reading Clare Johnson’s Mindful Dreaming: Harness the Power of Lucid Dreaming for Happiness, Health, and Positive Change, which I’m very much enjoying (and looking forward to her upcoming interview here).

~ArthurG

1 Like

@ArthurG cool! Just checked out Mindful Dreaming, will give it a look and let you know…

2 Likes

In Love With The World: A Monk’s Journey Through the Bardos of Living and Dying

I usually get audiobooks but I decided to read this one because I wanted to take my time and really think about the concepts he explores in his travels. He leaves his high and well-protected position at a Tibetan monastery and experiences the world as a penniless traveller riding the trains in India and meeting people as an ordinary person. I love the way he explains various concepts from Tibetan Buddhism as he experiences the world first-hand as an anonymous traveller. I’m about half way through it and savor the slow pace. Anyone else read(ing) it?

6 Likes

I am following this conversation and appreciate all of the recommendations. I’ve just finished up school for the year and I am looking forward to having the summer to read more.

4 Likes

I read ‘In love with the World’ a couple of weeks ago. We did a book group discussion on it in my sangha. I thought it was amazing. His ability to describe in such a clear way his inner experience was amazing. :slightly_smiling_face:

5 Likes

Hey @womp, did you read Mindful Dreaming? If so, how did you like it? I’m looking forward to the author’s interview on Night Club! :smile:

~ArthurG

1 Like

Currently reading Jennifer Dumpert’s Liminal Dreaming: Exploring Consciousness at the Edge of Sleep and quite enjoying it! For various reasons this seems like a good area for me to focus on at this time. I love how accessible it is. I’m looking forward to seeing Dumpert [pronounced DOOM PEAR] in San Francisco on July 10th. I hope she’s interviewed on Night Club at some point.

At the edges of consciousness, between waking and sleeping, there’s a swirling, free associative state of mind that is the domain of liminal dreams. As we sink into slumber, we pass through hypnagogia, the first of the two liminal dream states. In this transitional zone, memories, perceptions, and imaginings arise in a fast moving, hallucinatory, semi-conscious remix. On the other end of the night, as we wake, we experience hypnopompia, the hazy, pleasant, drift that is the other liminal dream state. Readers of Liminal Dreaming will learn step-by-step how to create a dream practice, integrating the deeply unusual half-waking dream states of hypnagogia and hypnopompia into their lives in personally meaningful ways. Working with liminal dreams can improve sleep, mitigate anxiety and depression, help to heal trauma, and aid creativity and problem-solving. Liminal dreaming practice is also far easier to learn than lucid dreaming practice, making it possible for the reader to begin working with these dreams this very night. [LINK]

~ArthurG

3 Likes

I haven’t, been putting my reading / input on hold to free up mental space to do stuff.

2 Likes

The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa: A New Translation, by Tsangnyon Heruka (translated by Christopher Stagg). I’ve read other books about Milarepa but this is the easiest to follow and the most satisfying for me as a non-scholar but interested lay-person. The concepts that run through his songs are frequently woven into Andrew’s discussions and I find that I am getting a very personal view of this great Yogi and am savoring the experience. It’s my go-to-sleep/can’t sleep reading material.

A few years back there was an excellent Milarepa Bio (part 1) which ended just at the good part when he started on the journey to seek his teacher. It’s well worth watching too.

2 Likes

I really like the sound of this book. Just out of curiosity, does she suggest we go through this stage as we first fall asleep or in later night time sleep sessions? I experience it if I wake up and go back to sleep but I’ve never experienced it at the beginning of the night when i first go to sleep. Hope that makes sense.

2 Likes

I would LOOOOOVE a book club. I’m reading so much at the moment but only problem is my friends aren’t quite in the same headspace so think I just bewilder them when I talk about all this stuff.

I’ll put more book recommendations up later but for now I’ve just finished James Kingsland’s two books,

Am I Dreaming? and Siddhartha’s Brain: The Science of Meditation, Mindfulness and Enlightenment

I was first introduced to him through one of Andrews wonderful interviews and I really enjoyed both these books.

I also have The Mind Illuminated: A Complete Meditation Guide Integrating Buddhist Wisdom and Brain Science for Greater Mindfulness by John Yates Phd and Matthew Immergut. It’s detailed but an easy to read guide to starting a daily meditation practice.

3 Likes

Good morning, Mutashi. :slight_smile:
I’d be interested to chat about books, too. I’m currently re-reading Clare Johnson’s Complete Guide to Lucid Dreaming and am also enjoying Where People Fly and Water Runs Uphill (which has a chapter on lucid dreaming), if you’d be interested to talk about either of those.

3 Likes

Yes as @womp say, Castañeda is vage if we are looking for detailed guides.
At the same time, he introduces readers to such a rich world, images and sensations, that it becomes Art material for dreams…

2 Likes

Additional information about, The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa by T. Heruka (Chris Stagg translation). It’s all there! After reading this book I understand Andrew’s great affinity for this enlightened Yogi. It takes a while to get used to the information contained because it is not a story of his life, though a synopsis is included at the end of the book. The songs contain such profound details about the path to liberation and the place of our minds in the process. Advice on how to proceed on the path is simply amazing!

2 Likes

We go through liminal dreaming both when we go to sleep and when we wake up. In the former case it’s called the hypnagogic state, in the latter the hypnopompic state.

~ArthurG

2 Likes

Hey Moongate

I’ve not read those but am listening to Claire Johnson’s audiobook Dream therapy. It’s an interesting read although I feel It’s maybe not quite right for me yet. I need to improve my dream recall and stability before moving onto working with them. I admire Claire and her wonderful ability to lucid dream though.

Maybe someone could suggest a book for us all to read and then we could have a sort of book club talk after people have finished?

3 Likes

I love the sound of your sangha. Is it online or do you go somewhere in person?

2 Likes

Ok here are the books I have read and play to read since getting into lucid dreaming and meditation. Hope this helps anyone looking for books. I highly recommend the ones I’ve finished.

Reading:
Sleeping, dreaming and dying. Edited by Francisco j.varela
Dreaming Yourself Awake by Alan Wallace

Books yet to read:
Be as you are by David Godman, Sri Raman Maharishi
The attention Revolution by Alan Wallace
Dzogchen Teachings by Chogyal Namkhai norbu

Books I have read:

The ones mentioned in my previous post

Exploring the world of lucid dreaming by Stephen LaBerge and Howard Rheingold. This is a great book packed full of info on how to lucid dream.

The case against reality by Donald Hoffman. Super interesting and inspiring when getting into meditation/exploring the experience of consciousness.

Dream yoga and the practice of natural light by chogyal namkhai norbu
The Tibetan yogas of dream and sleep by tenzin wangyal rinpoche. Both these books were massive eye openers to the enormous world of what goes on when we sleep from a Tibetan Buddhists viewpoint. They have explored this area deeply and have learnt so much. I’m no where near ready to try out their techniques but it’s inspiring to read.

4 Likes

Does anyone here read fiction? I just discovered Paul Trembly’s The Little Sleep. In addition to referencing Chandler and the noir genre, his PI has narcolepsy, with lots of hypnogogic hallucinations. A lot of his detective work is trying to tell dream from waking reality.

Bazinga!

I only bought it yesterday, so I haven’t read it yet. It seems so spot on for lucid dreaming practice, I wondered if anyone else here has read it yet? Is Tremblay is even a member of this group? I did a couple searches, but found no other references to him.

2 Likes