A great question for Evan Thompson

Is there a neuroscientific explanation for events that occur in the dreamworld that have no precedence in one’s ‘awake’ memory or any previous ‘awake’ experience . I am referring to the UTube ‘Lucid Dreaming with Alan Wallace, Stephen LaBerge, Fariba Bogzaran’ at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PozGrXvTlTc. Fariba recounts meeting her Buddhist teacher in real life by whom she had been previously taught in her dreams. And Andrew Holecek @Andrew recounts being taught practice by teachers in his own dreams. What goes on here neuroscientifically? @evanthompson

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That’s a really interesting question. Personally I’m skeptical that this actually happens in any literal sense. However, I’d love to have compelling personal experience that would lead me to think otherwise (NOTE: any teachers out there who have the ability and inclination to come into my dreams and teach me, please consider this an open invitation. :wink:)

@adriantoo2, could you say approximately where Fariba says this in the hour-long video you posted? I watched this video some time ago but don’t remember that part offhand.

~ArthurG

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At 9:39 she talked about being instructed by a Lama. Her accent is a little difficult to make out but I think it is Lama Tharchin Rinpoche ( Dzogchen teacher ) who died in 2013.

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Thanks, paulmaben. Fariba Bogzaran would make a great Night Club interview :thinking:

~ArthurG

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How do we request that?

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I’m not sure how to request interviews currently, @paulmaben . There used to be a link on the site somewhere to submit suggestions, but I can’t find it at the moment. Maybe one could start a thread in the Guest Interviews section of the forum, or by using the Contact page.

~ArthurG

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Hi @paulmaben - we have a category in discourse #interview-suggestions - where interview guests can be suggested :slight_smile:

I’ve been in contact with Fariba about doing this, she’s up for it, just needs to do it later. Stay tuned.

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Neuroscience is powerful, but it can’t explain everything. Eventually there may be a neurophenomenological riff on this, ie., the neural correlates to the experience. But that only goes so far. We have to be careful, IMO, not to fall into absolutistic traps, or reductionist snares. Explanatory power should be spread wide, which is why I support integral approaches.

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