How far have you managed to get in the dreaming practice side of Dream Yoga?

Appreciate you letting me know that. I think that will be something to pull the trigger on when I am a little more advanced in my practice. I think that is a very fair price for private instruction with an expert! Still have not been able to achieve lucidity on demand yet. But I have been upping the daytime practices more and more.

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Mainly „hand through walls“, flying and meditation with dream eyes closed.
Transformation of objects has not worked yet, although I tried only few times.

I am currently working on LD-prolongation I.e.stability and want to explore the „multiplication“ of dream objects next.

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After many lucid dream experiences, insomnia began to break this streak of accomplishment. That with a psychic attack from wasps stopped my setting up dreaming for several years. Now I’m am beginning again but it is as if the dream portal closed when I’m halted practice. With daily reading and listening to videos on NC I am hoping to resume in a more healthy way.

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I can relate to the insomnia hiccup, which was my motivation to take one of Andrew’s course in the first place. I’m doing better, with some help, but it’s not a binary problem so it’s a constant vigilant pursuit: overcoming insomniac influences.

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My insomnia hiccup has become pretty severe. I’ve averaging 5-6 hours of sleep (or less, I don’t have a tracker and I avoid watching the clock per the usual recommendations) per night. My sleep is getting truncated at the later stages, bedtime falling asleep is not an issue and is almost always very fast. So I’m missing a ton of REM…and dreaming, and that’s taking a toll on my motivation. I’m continuing with my efforts to remain in lucid presence during the day, paying attention to experience and my reaction to experience (per TYoDaS).
So my efforts are redirected for now to fixing sleep, and returning to quality and quantity of sleep.

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I’ve tried lots of teas and supplements to try to alleviate various problems. Current success involves some CBD Tea I found at the recent retreat at Menla, High T. It’s pricy, but seems to work really well in keeping me in bed and asleep, even dreaming.

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Before insomnia disrupted my sleep, I used the WILD method. I had frequent lucid dreams, was able to stabilize and lengthen them, flew under many different conditions, meaning on my belly almost hitting the floor all the way to incredibly fast, high to visit other worlds in a rather animation style. I have gone thru walls. I tried to heal my sick cat with meetings with dream doctors. (Didn’t work). Looked for a violin teacher who rejected me 3 times. Had experiences that sometimes changed into OBEs. Created a lengthy art piece in a series of dreams and published about it in The Lucid Art Exchange of Robert Waggoner as well as other articles on general oneironaut stuff. Used Nicolas Newport system of multiple awakening using timer to awaken every few minutes after 5 hours of sleep. Very effective. This period of heavy obsessive Ldreaming went on for a couple of years but eventually collapsed. Now I am dealing with same problem as @Dream_Hacker, losing REM in a desert of insomnia

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@Carolel This bout of insomnia is really kicking my a$$. I’m used to fairly infrequent lucids, getting lucid always takes a big very continuous boost of intent over days/weeks. But what really chaps my hide is the loss of dreams – Recall used to come easy to me, I would have so much dream recall on some nights I just couldn’t contain it all, but with the knowledge that I was in fact dreaming, it seemed, all night long. Highly vivid, alternate-reality, “wow-you-mean-THAT-was-a-DREAM!?” level of non-lucid dreaming.
Now, for the last 2-3 weeks (I think the trend has been much longer than that though) I wake up with a few pitiful fragments after about 5 hours of sleep, and despite my best relaxation methods, almost never can fall asleep again, missing the best morning REM time and time again. I’m trying to keep up my illusory form day work and keep a positive attitude, but with night after night of almost no recall at all, it’s getting pretty hard to keep at it…

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What’s your daily routine like? Perhaps some changes and illusory body practices are in order. Daniel Love, I remember, and others, talk about the work involved with lucid dreaming and I sometimes wonder if I took dreaming for granted when it was easy for me. Now that it isn’t, it can get frustrating, but each day is a new one and I’m always trying something to break up the routine. Currently, the tea I’ve been using helps me get to sleep. I have reset my getting up time from the recent retreat with Andrew at Menla, so I get up at 7:30 and feel fresher. I use Galantamine frequently to help me remember dreams and that works well too.

I’ve been trying to follow sleep expert advice: get up at the same time every day no matter what (I will break this if I feel I’m on a dreaming roll, because after all one of the major points of good sleep is good dreaming! But I do this rarely), and get outside immediately for morning sunlight in my eyes. I eat and exercise a bit right away, too, to firmly establish my “morning” in my circadian rhythm. I try to limit evening light but this is challenging as my spouse detests darkness or even slightly dim lighting in the evening/night time. I avoid all alcohol (never much of a drinker but would sometimes have a glass of wine but now I’m completely abstaining), caffeine (I’m not a coffee or tea drinker but I’m very caffeine sensitive so I’m avoiding dark chocolate now as well), and don’t and have never smoked. Regular bedtime is also a challenge with a spouse who does not prioritize bedtime. But at least I can control waking time.
Right now I’m not working so I do a lot of walking meditation, exercise, and try to remain all day in lucid presence. I’m not doing any seated meditation but I will add this, perhaps some zhine from TYoDaS, and I’d like to get into some energy work with inner fire yoga from the Tibetan tantric tradition.
I try to keep awareness of my state (waking dreaming) on my mind at all times, and keep a critically reflective eye out for dream signs.
It sounds like a lot and maybe it is! I may be overloading myself in day work. I may try backing off a bit. When I am not following any meditative or LD day practice, and am not stressed or anxious, I can generally sleep a solid 8 hours.
I’ve avoiding nootropics like galantamine for now, given my insomnia tendencies. I’ve gotten back to sleep perhaps a couple times on galantamine for all the times I’ve tried it, and it’s ALWAYS after a multi-hour struggle to remain relaxed enough to fall asleep. I have to say, though, the dreams on galantamine are mind-blowingly clear and vivid. But it’s basically a mind-altering pharmaceutical, so I’d likely tread lightly with it if I do try it again. I avoid melatonin because I don’t want to mess around with my circadian rhythm.
I do mix things up in day work. Some times I’m focused more on body awareness, sometimes location awareness, sometime bringing it all together in a holistic “lucid presence” awareness.
I’m keeping up the day work in the hope that the sleep situation will resolve itself.
If it doesn’t (and I’m reading some insomnia self-help books), I’ll try loosening up.

After all, we in NightClub know: “Not too tight, not too loose.” I’m really trying to keep it relaxed and not tight, but given the fact of the insomnia, something is obviously too tight.

p.s. @_Barry thanks for the message :).

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Hope you can make it to “The Sleep Doctor” this afternoon. He’s good at discussing this type of problem. I’ve worked with him in person and he’s spot-on with his advice. If you can’t attend live, you can send in a question and then check the recording later for an answer, or you can email him as well.

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When I was prolific at lucid dreaming, I just assumed that I would only become more adept and that it was here to stay. After a while I began to set up dreaming during the day and into the night, with only insomnia as a result, and I began to have doubts that I could access that state again. I lost confidence. Then, even ordinary dreams turned into vague fragments. I think there is such a thing as trying too hard, having too great expectations. This chases dreams away. I have heard others say not to try for LDs every night or OBEs either. There are other qualities that we can reach for instead, in meditation or in mindfulness,to not get overly tunnel visioned about dreaming being the only result we are after.